React Client Tutorial

Get started with React and Speechly

Introduction

This tutorial will help you to get up and running with Speechly by guiding you through the process of building a simple voice filtering web app with Speechly and React.

You can find the source code for this tutorial on GitHub and you can also try out the final result hosted on GitHub Pages.

Prerequisites

Since we’ll be using create-react-app for this tutorial, we’ll need the following tools:

  • Node.js 8.10+
  • npm 5.2+

Note that this tutorial also uses TypeScript, so feel free to check out TypeScript documentation if you’re not familiar with it.

1. Creating an app

Let’s get started by creating an app and installing its dependencies:

npx create-react-app speechly-voice-filter --typescript
cd speechly-voice-filter
npm i

Now that you’ve created the app, you can check it out by running npm start - it should open a browser tab with your app running in it.

2. Adding data and layout

Since we are building a filtering app, let’s add some data to filter and layout to display it.

To make it simple, our data source will be just a static array with some popular repositories on GitHub. Let’s add the following code and save it as src/data.ts:

export type Repository = {
  name: string;
  description: string;
  language: string;
  followers: number;
  stars: number;
  forks: number;
};

export const repositories: Repository[] = [
  {
    name: "microsoft/typescript",
    description:
      "TypeScript is a superset of JavaScript that compiles to clean JavaScript output",
    language: "TypeScript",
    followers: 2200,
    stars: 65000,
    forks: 8700,
  },
  {
    name: "nestjs/nest",
    description:
      "A progressive Node.js framework for building efficient, scalable, and enterprise-grade server-side applications on top of TypeScript & JavaScript (ES6, ES7, ES8)",
    language: "TypeScript",
    followers: 648,
    stars: 30900,
    forks: 2800,
  },
  {
    name: "microsoft/vscode",
    description: "Visual Studio Code",
    language: "TypeScript",
    followers: 3000,
    stars: 105000,
    forks: 16700,
  },
  {
    name: "denoland/deno",
    description: "A secure JavaScript and TypeScript runtime",
    language: "TypeScript",
    followers: 1700,
    stars: 68000,
    forks: 3500,
  },
  {
    name: "kubernetes/kubernetes",
    description: "Production-Grade Container Scheduling and Management",
    language: "Go",
    followers: 3300,
    stars: 70700,
    forks: 25500,
  },
  {
    name: "moby/moby",
    description:
      "Moby Project - a collaborative project for the container ecosystem to assemble container-based systems",
    language: "Go",
    followers: 3200,
    stars: 58600,
    forks: 16900,
  },
  {
    name: "gohugoio/hugo",
    description: "The world’s fastest framework for building websites",
    language: "Go",
    followers: 1000,
    stars: 47200,
    forks: 5400,
  },
  {
    name: "grafana/grafana",
    description:
      "The tool for beautiful monitoring and metric analytics & dashboards for Graphite, InfluxDB & Prometheus & More",
    language: "Go",
    followers: 1300,
    stars: 37500,
    forks: 7600,
  },
  {
    name: "pytorch/pytorch",
    description:
      "Tensors and Dynamic neural networks in Python with strong GPU acceleration",
    language: "Python",
    followers: 1600,
    stars: 43000,
    forks: 11200,
  },
  {
    name: "tensorflow/tensorflow",
    description: "An Open Source Machine Learning Framework for Everyone",
    language: "Python",
    followers: 8300,
    stars: 149000,
    forks: 82900,
  },
  {
    name: "django/django",
    description: "The Web framework for perfectionists with deadlines",
    language: "Python",
    followers: 2300,
    stars: 52800,
    forks: 22800,
  },
  {
    name: "apache/airflow",
    description:
      "Apache Airflow - A platform to programmatically author, schedule, and monitor workflows",
    language: "Python",
    followers: 716,
    stars: 18500,
    forks: 7200,
  },
];

We can display this data in a simple table, so let’s add a component for that under src/RepoList.tsx:

import React from "react";

import { Repository } from "./data";

type Props = {
  repos: Repository[];
};

export const RepoList = ({ repos }: Props): JSX.Element => {
  return (
    <div className="block">
      <table>
        <thead>
          <tr>
            <th>Name</th>
            <th>Language</th>
            <th>Description</th>
            <th>Followers</th>
            <th>Stars</th>
            <th>Forks</th>
          </tr>
        </thead>
        <tbody>
          {repos.map((repo) => (
            <RepoRow repo={repo} key={repo.name} />
          ))}
        </tbody>
      </table>
    </div>
  );
};

const RepoRow = React.memo(
  ({ repo }: { repo: Repository }): JSX.Element => {
    return (
      <tr>
        <td>{repo.name}</td>
        <td>{repo.language}</td>
        <td>{repo.description}</td>
        <td>{repo.followers}</td>
        <td>{repo.stars}</td>
        <td>{repo.forks}</td>
      </tr>
    );
  }
);

In order to show the table, we’ll need to render it. We could render our table right in our top-level App component, but let’s instead use a top-level component for our app under src/SpeechApp.tsx - it will come in handy later on:

import React from "react";

import { repositories } from "./data";

import { RepoList } from "./RepoList";

export const SpeechApp: React.FC = (): JSX.Element => {
  return (
    <div>
      <RepoList repos={repositories} />
    </div>
  );
};

Now let’s add it to our top-level component:

import React from "react";
import { SpeechProvider } from "@speechly/react-client";

import "./App.css";

import { SpeechApp } from "./SpeechApp";

function App(): JSX.Element {
  return (
    <div className="App">
      <SpeechApp />
    </div>
  );
}

export default App;

3. Adding Speechly client and a microphone button

Before we proceed with the app, let’s take a quick detour and train a very simple and not very useful Speechly app, so that we can use it to test our integration later on.

Go to https://speechly.com/dashboard and login (or sign up if you haven’t yet) and create a new app (you can check our Speechly Dashboard quickstart guide if you feel lost). Feel free to use any configuration you want, even an almost empty configuration with just “Hello world” will suffice, but make sure your app is deployed!

A simple Speechly configuration example
A simple Speechly configuration example

Once you have your Speechly app deployed, let’s integrate it. Start by installing Speechly React client:

npm i --save @speechly/react-client

The client exposes a context provider and a hook that allows you to consume that context. Let’s add the context provider to src/App.tsx. Make sure you provide the App ID of your Speechly app as a property for SpeechProvider!

import React from "react";
import { SpeechProvider } from "@speechly/react-client";

import "./App.css";

function App(): JSX.Element {
  return (
    <div className="App">
      <SpeechProvider appId="your-app-id-here" language="en-US">
        <SpeechApp />
      </SpeechProvider>
    </div>
  );
}

export default App;

Next, let’s add some code to act as the microphone button. Also, it would be nice to see what we are saying, so let’s also render the transcript next to the button for some feedback. Let’s make that a separate component and save it as src/Microphone.tsx:

import React from "react";
import {
  Word as SpeechWord,
  SpeechSegment,
  SpeechState,
} from "@speechly/react-client";

type Props = {
  segment?: SpeechSegment;
  state: SpeechState;
  onRecord: () => Promise<void>;
};

export const Microphone = React.memo(
  ({ state, segment, onRecord }: Props): JSX.Element => {
    let enabled = false;
    let text = "Error";

    switch (state) {
      case SpeechState.Idle:
      case SpeechState.Ready:
        enabled = true;
        text = "Start";
        break;
      case SpeechState.Recording:
        enabled = true;
        text = "Stop";
        break;
      case SpeechState.Connecting:
      case SpeechState.Loading:
        enabled = false;
        text = "Loading...";
        break;
    }

    return (
      <div>
        <button onClick={onRecord} disabled={!enabled}>
          {text}
        </button>
        <Transcript segment={segment} />
      </div>
    );
  }
);

const Transcript = React.memo(
  ({ segment }: { segment?: SpeechSegment }): JSX.Element => {
    if (segment === undefined) {
      return (
        <div>
          <em>Waiting for speech input...</em>
        </div>
      );
    }

    return (
      <div>
        {segment.words.map((w) => (
          <Word word={w} key={w.index} />
        ))}
      </div>
    );
  }
);

const Word = React.memo(
  ({ word }: { word: SpeechWord }): JSX.Element => {
    if (word.isFinal) {
      return <strong>{`${word.value} `}</strong>;
    }

    return <span>{`${word.value} `}</span>;
  }
);

As you can see, this component renders a button that calls the onRecord callback passed in the properties and uses the state of Speechly client to determine when to enable the button and which text to use as its label. In addition to that, the component also renders the transcript of the phrase by assembling individual transcripted words from a segment (check out this article in our documentation for more information about how SLU API works). Since a word can be either tentative (i.e., its value can change as the API receives more audio data) or final, we use bold text to highlight final words.

One more step - we’d need to render our component and hook it up to the API. Let’s add it to our SpeechApp component:

import React from "react";
import { useSpeechContext } from "@speechly/react-client";

import { repositories } from "./data";

import { RepoList } from "./RepoList";
import { Microphone } from "./Microphone";

export const SpeechApp: React.FC = (): JSX.Element => {
  const { toggleRecording, speechState, segment } = useSpeechContext();

  return (
    <div>
      <Microphone
        segment={segment}
        state={speechState}
        onRecord={toggleRecording}
      />
      <RepoList repos={repositories} />
    </div>
  );
};

Here we use the other main part of Speechly React client - a custom hook that consumes the state preserved in SpeechProvider. Feel free to check the API documentation of React client to see what other properties are returned by the hook.

Now you can go ahead and try talking to the app and see what you get back in the transcript. Congratulations, you’ve just integrated Speechly into the app.

However, we still need to implement the filtering functionality, so let’s go ahead and update our Speechly app configuration to support that.

4. Configuring Speechly app

Now that we’ve integrated the API into the app, it’s time to make our Speechly app useful. Let’s add a couple of simple commands for manipulating the data we see in the table:

  • A command to filter by programming language, e.g., when a user says, “Show me TypeScript repos,” the app will only show repos with that specific language.
  • A command to sort the results in a specific order, e.g., “Sort the results by forks,” will sort the repos by the number of forks it has.
  • A command to reset the filters, e.g., “Reset the filters to default,” will remove the language filter and reset the sorting to some default.

Let’s go back to Speechly dashboard and update the configuration of our app with the following:

# Which languages we can filter by
languages = [
  Go
  TypeScript
  Python
]

# Which fields we can sort by
sort_fields = [
  name
  description
  language
  followers
  stars
  forks
]

# Synonyms for "repo"
results = [
  items
  results
  repos
  repositories
]

# A couple of commands for filtering.
#
# This will expand into e.g. following examples (not exhaustive):
# "Show all Go repos"
# "Show me only TypeScript repositories"
# "Show Python results"
# etc.
#
# Words in curly brackets ("{me}") are optional.
# Square brackets are for lists (e.g. one option from the list may be used)
*filter show {me} {[all | only]} $languages(language) {$results}
*filter filter {$results} by $languages(language) {language}

# A command for sorting, e.g.:
# "Sort the repos by name"
# "Order results by forks"
# etc.
*sort [sort | order] {the} {$results} by $sort_fields(sort_field)

# A command for resetting the filters, e.g.:
# "Reset all filters to default"
# "Remove the filters"
# "Reset to default"
# etc.
*reset [reset | remove] {[the | all]} {filters} {to default}

Don’t forget to add sort, filter, and reset as intents and languages and sort_fields as entities!

As you can see from the comments, this configuration will make our Speechly app understand the commands we need and properly detect entities and intents. Keep in mind that the cool part is that the model will also be able to understand the variations of commands that are not explicitly defined in our configuration. The same also applies to entities - the app won’t be limited to only detecting “Go”, “TypeScript”, and “Python” as options for the language, but other words as well, which will be roughly in the same place in a phrase. For instance, you could try saying, “Show me all Javascript repos”). However, with very domain-specific words, it’s always a good idea to list them all in your configuration; otherwise, they might be mistaken for some regular words. For example, the API might not properly detect “Rust” as a programming language if you say, “Show me all Rust repositories,” because it would think that you meant “rust” as that thing that destroys metals. You can read more about how to configure Speechly applications in our documentation.

Once you’ve deployed your new version of the Speechly app, let’s continue to parsing the results.

5. Parsing intents and entities

Now that we’ve trained a version of Speechly app with proper entities and intents, let’s parse the results. First let’s add our parsing logic to src/parser.ts:

import { SpeechSegment } from "@speechly/react-client";

export enum IntentType {
  Unknown = "unknown",
  Sort = "sort",
  Filter = "filter",
  Reset = "reset",
}

export enum EntityType {
  Language = "language",
  SortField = "sort_field",
}

export enum SortEntityType {
  Unknown = "unknown",
  Name = "name",
  Description = "description",
  Language = "language",
  Followers = "followers",
  Stars = "stars",
  Forks = "forks",
}

const SpeechIntentValues = Object.values(IntentType) as string[];
const SortTypeValues = Object.values(SortEntityType) as string[];

export function parseIntent(segment: SpeechSegment): IntentType {
  const { intent } = segment;

  if (SpeechIntentValues.includes(intent.intent)) {
    return intent.intent as IntentType;
  }

  return IntentType.Unknown;
}

export function parseLanguageEntity(segment: SpeechSegment): string[] {
  const langs: string[] = [];

  for (const e of segment.entities) {
    if (e.type === EntityType.Language) {
      langs.push(e.value.toLowerCase());
    }
  }

  return langs;
}

export function parseSortEntity(segment: SpeechSegment): SortEntityType {
  let s = SortEntityType.Unknown;

  for (const e of segment.entities) {
    const val = e.value.toLowerCase();

    if (e.type === EntityType.SortField && SortTypeValues.includes(val)) {
      s = val as SortEntityType;
    }
  }

  return s;
}

Here we define a couple of functions to parse intents and different entity types from a SpeechSegment, which is returned by useSpeechContext. As you can see, the code is pretty straightforward. Most of it is actually just listing which intents and entities we expect and defining them as enumerations, since it’s always a good idea to check the results returned from API against a pre-defined list of allowed values to avoid bugs. Another good idea is to make sure we use consistent case (in this case by casting the results to lower case) to avoid false negatives when, for example, comparing STARS to stars.

Now that we have our code for parsing the results from a segment, it’s time to use it. Let’s update our SpeechApp and add some code that calls our parser:

import React, { useEffect } from "react";
import { SpeechSegment, useSpeechContext } from "@speechly/react-client";

import { repositories } from "./data";
import {
  IntentType,
  SortEntityType,
  parseIntent,
  parseLanguageEntity,
  parseSortEntity,
} from "./parser";

import { RepoList } from "./RepoList";
import { Microphone } from "./Microphone";

export const SpeechApp: React.FC = (): JSX.Element => {
  const { toggleRecording, speechState, segment } = useSpeechContext();

  useEffect(() => {
    if (segment === undefined) {
      return;
    }

    parseSegment(segment);
  }, [segment]);

  return (
    <div>
      <Microphone
        segment={segment}
        state={speechState}
        onRecord={toggleRecording}
      />
      <RepoList repos={repositories} />
    </div>
  );
};

function parseSegment(segment: SpeechSegment) {
  const intent = parseIntent(segment);

  switch (intent) {
    case IntentType.Filter:
      const languages = parseLanguageEntity(segment);
      console.log("Filtering by languages", languages);
      break;
    case IntentType.Sort:
      const sortBy = parseSortEntity(segment);
      if (sortBy !== SortEntityType.Unknown) {
        console.log("Sorting by field", sortBy);
      }
      break;
    case IntentType.Reset:
      console.log("Resetting the filters");
      break;
  }
}

Here we define a parseSegment function that is called every time a segment changes by using React’s useEffect hook. Since segment might come as undefined (this happens after the user stops speaking and the API sends its final response), we want to check for that before trying to parse it. The function checks for the intent and then calls the appropriate entity parser (or no entity parser at all if the intent was to reset the filters). For now, we are just going to log the results of the parser, but to use them, we’ll have to add some filters. Let’s continue with that!

6. Adding and applying filters

In order to apply filters, we’d need to implement some filtering logic, so let’s do just that and add it as src/filter.ts:

import { Repository } from "./data";
import { SortEntityType } from "./parser";

export type Filter = {
  languages?: string[];
  sortBy?: SortEntityType;
};

export function filterRepos(
  input: Repository[],
  filters: Filter
): Repository[] {
  let output = input;

  const languages = filters.languages ?? [];
  if (languages.length > 0) {
    output = input.filter((repo) =>
      languages.includes(repo.language.toLowerCase())
    );
  }

  if (filters.sortBy === undefined) {
    return output;
  }

  return output.sort((left, right) => {
    switch (filters.sortBy) {
      case SortEntityType.Name:
        return left.name.localeCompare(right.name);
      case SortEntityType.Description:
        return left.description.localeCompare(right.description);
      case SortEntityType.Language:
        return left.language.localeCompare(right.language);
      case SortEntityType.Followers:
        return compareNumber(left.followers, right.followers);
      case SortEntityType.Stars:
        return compareNumber(left.stars, right.stars);
      case SortEntityType.Forks:
        return compareNumber(left.forks, right.forks);
    }

    return 0;
  });
}

function compareNumber(left: number, right: number) {
  if (left < right) {
    return -1;
  }

  if (left > right) {
    return 1;
  }

  return 0;
}

Here we define a Filter type that contains a list of languages to display and the field to sort by. We also define a function filterRepos that takes a list of repositories and a filter and returns a new list of repositories filtered and sorted according to that filter.

Now we need to call the filtering function when we get new results from the API, so let’s also update our SpeechApp to do that:

import React, { useEffect, useState } from "react";
import { SpeechSegment, useSpeechContext } from "@speechly/react-client";

import { repositories, Repository } from "./data";
import { Filter, filterRepos } from "./filter";
import {
  IntentType,
  SortEntityType,
  parseIntent,
  parseLanguageEntity,
  parseSortEntity,
} from "./parser";

import { RepoList } from "./RepoList";
import { Microphone } from "./Microphone";

export const SpeechApp: React.FC = (): JSX.Element => {
  const [filter, setFilter] = useState<Filter>(defaultFilter);
  const [repos, setRepos] = useState<Repository[]>(repositories);

  const { toggleRecording, speechState, segment } = useSpeechContext();

  useEffect(() => {
    if (segment === undefined) {
      return;
    }

    const nextFilter = {
      ...filter,
      ...parseSegment(segment),
    };

    setFilter(nextFilter);
    setRepos(filterRepos(repositories, nextFilter));
    // eslint-disable-next-line react-hooks/exhaustive-deps
  }, [segment]);

  return (
    <div>
      <Microphone
        segment={segment}
        state={speechState}
        onRecord={toggleRecording}
      />
      <RepoList repos={repos} />
    </div>
  );
};

const emptyFilter: Filter = {};
const defaultFilter: Filter = {
  languages: [],
  sortBy: SortEntityType.Name,
};

function parseSegment(segment: SpeechSegment): Filter {
  const intent = parseIntent(segment);

  switch (intent) {
    case IntentType.Filter:
      const languages = parseLanguageEntity(segment);

      if (languages.length === 0) {
        return emptyFilter;
      }

      return {
        languages,
      };
    case IntentType.Sort:
      const sortBy = parseSortEntity(segment);
      if (sortBy !== SortEntityType.Unknown) {
        return {
          sortBy,
        };
      }

      return emptyFilter;
    case IntentType.Reset:
      return defaultFilter;
    default:
      return emptyFilter;
  }
}

Here we use React’s useState hook to create a couple of stateful variables for storing filtered results and last filters (you can append them by saying “Show me all Go repos” first and then following up with “Sort by start”). Every time we get a new state of segment from the API, we call our parseSegment to parse the filters from it and then append those filters to the ones we’ve saved in the state. Then we also apply new filters to the list of repositories before passing them on to rendering.

Conclusion

And that’s it! Now you can go ahead and try out your app - you can filter the repos by language, apply a sorting order, and reset the filters.

If you want to delve into the details, go ahead and check out our documentation and our public GitHub.

You can also check the source code for this tutorial at https://github.com/speechly/react-example-repo-filtering. Feel free to navigate through individual commits - they refer to each section of this tutorial.


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Last updated by karoliina-louhema on October 19, 2020 at 12:54 +0300

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